Django Pre-flight is meant to help with creation of simple pages on which one can quickly gauge health of the system and its external dependencies. It's a great help for testers before actually delving into the system to be sure that all is configured correctly and any found problems are due to bugs in the code itself and not because of misconfiguration.

Almost every evening, between 8:30 and 10:00, my Wi-Fi just dies. This, in itself, could be explained by a crappy Wi-Fi source or some hardware failure, except that I know both of my neighbors are experiencing the same loss of signal at the same time. While the Wi-Fi is down, the LAN is OK, and anything plugged into Cat5 can access the Internet just fine. One possibility comes to mind — perhaps some other neighbor arrives home and turns on their router from 8:30 to 10:00? And something in their signal is hosing our Wi-Fi? I have tried looking around for software to help identify the source of interference, but either the programs are ridiculously expensive for a home user, or else my card (Intel Link 1000 BGN) isn't supported. (Netstumbler is an example of the latter.) Any suggestions on how I can track this down?

Skipfish is an active web application security reconnaissance tool. It prepares an interactive sitemap for the targeted site by carrying out a recursive crawl and dictionary-based probes. The resulting map is then annotated with the output from a number of active (but hopefully non-disruptive) security checks. The final report generated by the tool is meant to serve as a foundation for professional web application security assessments.

This codelab is built around Jarlsberg /yärlz'·bərg/, a small, cheesy web application that allows its users to publish snippets of text and store assorted files. "Unfortunately," Jarlsberg has multiple security bugs ranging from cross-site scripting and cross-site request forgery, to information disclosure, denial of service, and remote code execution. The goal of this codelab is to guide you through discovering some of these bugs and learning ways to fix them both in Jarlsberg and in general.

The codelab is organized by types of vulnerabilities. In each section, you'll find a brief description of a vulnerability and a task to find an instance of that vulnerability in Jarlsberg. Your job is to play the role of a malicious hacker and find and exploit the security bugs. In this codelab, you'll use both black-box hacking and white-box hacking.

Welcome to backtrack-linux.org, the highest rated and acclaimed Linux security distribution to date. BackTrack is a Linux-based penetration testing arsenal that aids security professionals in the ability to perform assessments in a purely native environment dedicated to hacking. Regardless if you’re making BackTrack your primary operating system, booting from a LiveDVD, or using your favorite thumbdrive, BackTrack has been customized down to every package, kernel configuration, script and patch solely for the purpose of the penetration tester.

See your web design on any browser on any operating system. Check javascripts, DHTML, forms and other dynamic functionality on any platform. Not just yours. Use our bank of testing machines remotely to test your website.

The 2010 CWE/SANS Top 25 Most Dangerous Programming Errors is a list of the most widespread and critical programming errors that can lead to serious software vulnerabilities. They are often easy to find, and easy to exploit. They are dangerous because they will frequently allow attackers to completely take over the software, steal data, or prevent the software from working at all.

The Top 25 list is a tool for education and awareness to help programmers to prevent the kinds of vulnerabilities that plague the software industry, by identifying and avoiding all-too-common mistakes that occur before software is even shipped. Software customers can use the same list to help them to ask for more secure software. Researchers in software security can use the Top 25 to focus on a narrow but important subset of all known security weaknesses. Finally, software managers and CIOs can use the Top 25 list as a measuring stick of progress in their efforts to secure their software.

JSLint takes a JavaScript source and scans it. If it finds a problem, it returns a message describing the problem and an approximate location within the source. The problem is not necessarily a syntax error, although it often is. JSLint looks at some style conventions as well as structural problems. It does not prove that your program is correct. It just provides another set of eyes to help spot problems.

De MonsterDebugger is an open source debugger for Adobe Flash, Flex and AIR. De MonsterDebugger is made in Flex and AIR by design studio De Monsters.

I have seen various postings about integration between FlexUnit with Ant, however most solutions seem to require a Flex server. My motivation here was to create an Ant task that has no dependency on a server. That would allow unit tests to be run in autonomously.

...

My solution is comprised of a controlling Ant task, flexunit, and a FlexUnit test runner, JUnitTestRunner, which is shown in the diagram below. The flexunit task starts a socket server running inside of a thread and launches the Flash Player, which runs the tests using the JUnitTestRunner. When JUnitTestRunner has finished running the test it formats the results as per the JUnit XML format and sends them to the flexunit task over an XML Socket, the flexunit task then saves them to disk. We can then use the JUnitReport task to create a report or use CruiseControl to create a report.

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